Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby eagle » Sat Sep 22, 2012 12:55 pm

RR said:
Getting cold up North. Wish I could rustle me up some pajamas like the toddler has....gotta have warm feet.


some animals, like bears, have a period of "hyperphagia" for the long cold winter...to build up some fat. Do Rats do that??? :lol:
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby jrich99 » Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:01 pm

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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby Range Rat » Tue Jan 08, 2013 5:13 am

Lots of feedback from, and within, the feet is a good thing even with dancing. Does an intention to dance a certain way create the body which is then supported by the feet, or are the feet our primary movers and shakers creating the body while it is dancing in that certain way. I think the latter makes more sense.

Some words from a dance site:

Overall the beauty of dance is in the feet. Consisting of 26 bones and forming 25 component joints, the feet are the first level of dance and basic rules that every person must become aware of. The foot propels a dancer to explore space and changes in space, allowing them to create lines with the other limbs of the body.

Greg Norman can cut a pretty good rug too.
You're ahead of where you were, and behind where you're going.
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby eagle » Wed Feb 13, 2013 2:05 am

http://thetalentcode.com/

I'm not sure how early Tiger and Rory started, but they came to mind.
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby Craig Toone » Wed Feb 13, 2013 4:58 am

Thanks for bringing this blog to my attention. Digesting every post and noting the successful things I already do, but also highlighting the vast gaps I need to work on.

eg I fantasize/meditate on success, but not on the journey to it. Thats going to change.

I like the idea of OODA loops. This is the basis of a great pre-shot routine. I also notice I do this when on a race-track too.

Teaching... having the student understand mechanics then leaving them with a soundbite to work on... For years my ingrained problem issue I fight everyday is hinging the right wrist inside on the takeaway. Recently I've been telling myself 'thumps up not in' and I'm doing alot better rather than just trying to feel the action. I'm an early wrist setter btw :)
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby jrich99 » Thu Feb 28, 2013 12:28 pm

http://thetalentcode.com/2013/02/28/how ... -practice/

Another great reminder that I need to be more consistent about submitting module videos.
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby eagle » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:46 am

The latest blog post on Talent Code has 25 comments so far, and there is a lot of talk about an app for smartphones that may be useful to sports, "Coach's Eye" is one, and there are others.

http://thetalentcode.com/

Anyone using?
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby Horizon » Sat Feb 01, 2014 10:26 am

You might call this Balanced-Positive Approach: equally split between negative and positive, and ending on the positive. Notice the complete wall of separation between the two phases. They don’t toggle back and forth between positive and negative. The two phases are kept as separate as night and day: first comes all negative, then all positive.

Many top performers (Peyton Manning and Steve Jobs jump to mind) embody this approach. Half the time, they are persnickety, chronically dissatisfied, negative, doubtful, obsessed with potential failures. The other half of the time, they’re incredibly positive, confident performers.

This isn’t surprising. The balanced-positive approach helps you avoid the pitfalls of positivity — namely, that you get surprised and demoralized by failure — and replaces it with a preparation that matches the reality of the world and also leaves you ready for performance. Good things and bad things will happen, and you can’t control either. But you can prepare.


Interesting
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby Ded2Journey » Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:01 pm

I thought I would revive this thread...hopefully I can get a few bites.

So, the concepts of this book revolve around building skills during your childhood. He bases this around the production of neuro (superhighway) pathways in the brain. My thought is that skill development is progressive w/ some plateaus. Plateaus are there to develop mental strength and discipline which further solidifies neural pathways in the brain for that particular skill.

Do you think age is truly a determining factor?
"People have always been telling me what I can't do. I guess I have wanted to show them. That's been one of my driving forces all my life." -Ben Hogan
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Re: Daniel Coyle. The Talent Code

Postby TheCrow » Wed Jul 09, 2014 5:51 pm

My pessimistic view is that once the neuro pathway is laid out, changing it is very difficult. So age doesn't really matter if you're trying something for the first time. You often see new golfers in their 30s get to single digit or better in a couple of years. But someone like me that has played off and on since 14 will struggle to ever improve because the wrong pathway to strike a golf ball has been set. I think learning something when you're young has the benefit of no paralysis by analysis. Kids learning is as simple as Monkey see monkey do. Maybe imitation just becomes a lot more uncomfortable as we age because we fear making mistakes.

So if anyone is going to start a new skill, I believe that you should either go straight to professional lessons or figure it out on your own and forget lessons all together. But mixing these two pathways is detrimental to improvement.
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