Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby eth14dev » Tue Dec 19, 2017 10:49 pm

...or maybe,

...just maybe,

...this lucky photographer actually got a shot of the elusive Henny Bogan on the golf course! :o


(... before he started firing people from his company that is..) :lol:
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby Range Rat » Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:39 am

Nicely produced piece here.
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby robbo » Fri Jan 12, 2018 9:32 am

Mesmerizing RR! His PIA is simply unreal.

Thanks for finding and posting this.
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby Range Rat » Fri Jan 12, 2018 6:36 pm

When I first glanced through the channel I noticed several good video titles but only watched the Hogan driving one. Not one of those driver swings did Hogan hold his finish, and somewhat remembering the titles of the videos I didn't watch maybe, or perhaps still fresh on my mind, it struck me watching the Hogan video he did not hold any finish so I went back to the channel and sure enough, a video about players not holding the finish.

Good look at someone at 2:20, is it Hogan, or Venturi
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby lagpressure » Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:49 pm

A great story about Hogan's resisting to play the new MacGregor golf ball in 1953. Hogan was on the MacGregor staff, but didn't like their ball. He played the Spalding Dot ball for years.

Enjoy

Hogan Dot.jpg
Hogan Dot.jpg (317.82 KiB) Viewed 1043 times
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby Frozen Divots » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:15 am

I do Motive Power and one company I deal with is Toro. Toro has archived materials from their golf course mower history. They used to have Hogan and Snead on the payroll, along with others. Hogan didn't just show up for photo ops and things like that, he was interested in how Toro designed their mowers and blades and would play shots, etc off the grass after it was mowed and would have input on blade/mower/type of grass things. He was pretty involved in the development of various machines in the 1940's and 1950's. Toro truly cared what he and Snead had to say.

The next time I am there I will try to get them to allow their things to be seen, if not I'll sneak some pics of the pictures and footage they have of the greats talking about these things. Lots of interesting things to see. It was cool to see that Hogan and Snead were involved in these issues behind the scenes.
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby lagpressure » Tue Feb 13, 2018 1:22 am

Going back over some stuff on George Knudson tonight.

Kudson had this to say about Hogan:

"Hogan was my main teacher. In 1960, I still hadn't figured the guy out. His shots had more character than the others, and he knew where the hole was. He had better balance than the other pros. He was so stable over the ball and throughout his swing. He looked so solid, yet he gave it everything he had. Hogan had a controlled and powerful golf swing. Balance was the key. It looked to me if you hit him anywhere, you'd be hitting something dead solid. He never looked wobbly. While I wasn't falling over, I was still rolling over the edge of my left foot (at finish) as so was everyone else.... everyone except Hogan. He finished dead solid flat on his left foot at finish. What he did was really quite elementary. He had a wide stance. He had a wider stance than the others. At set up, he pointed his left foot out about a 1/4 turn to the left and set it outside his left shoulder. A boxer's stance. A "go" position. He was ready to give it a whack with his whole body. By placing his left foot outside his left shoulder, he assured he would never roll over onto his foot and heel. After what I learned from Hogan, I incorporated it into my own swing. Before long, some said I looked more like Hogan than Hogan himself. It was a compliment, but I was still a long way off from being the natural people thought I was. I still didn't have the understanding of how to let myself swing. I was using too much effort and trying too hard. I was over exerting myself. Rather than simplifying the swing and eliminating moves I was adding to it. It took me a year and a half to incorporate what I had learned from Hogan.




It's not what you do that counts, it's what you intend to do"

George Knudson
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby twomasters » Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:33 pm

lagpressure wrote:
It's not what you do that counts, it's what you intend to do"

George Knudson


One of the best quotes ever for people to live by as far as the golf swing
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby Range Rat » Tue Feb 13, 2018 4:38 pm

lagpressure wrote:Going back over some stuff on George Knudson tonight.

Kudson had this to say about Hogan:

"Hogan was my main teacher. In 1960, I still hadn't figured the guy out. His shots had more character than the others, and he knew where the hole was. He had better balance than the other pros. He was so stable over the ball and throughout his swing. He looked so solid, yet he gave it everything he had. Hogan had a controlled and powerful golf swing. Balance was the key. It looked to me if you hit him anywhere, you'd be hitting something dead solid. He never looked wobbly. While I wasn't falling over, I was still rolling over the edge of my left foot (at finish) as so was everyone else.... everyone except Hogan. He finished dead solid flat on his left foot at finish. What he did was really quite elementary. He had a wide stance. He had a wider stance than the others. At set up, he pointed his left foot out about a 1/4 turn to the left and set it outside his left shoulder. A boxer's stance. A "go" position. He was ready to give it a whack with his whole body. By placing his left foot outside his left shoulder, he assured he would never roll over onto his foot and heel. After what I learned from Hogan, I incorporated it into my own swing. Before long, some said I looked more like Hogan than Hogan himself. It was a compliment, but I was still a long way off from being the natural people thought I was. I still didn't have the understanding of how to let myself swing. I was using too much effort and trying too hard. I was over exerting myself. Rather than simplifying the swing and eliminating moves I was adding to it. It took me a year and a half to incorporate what I had learned from Hogan.




Great video. Some sensations I experience are not things I like to talk about much as there are times, I am told, they sound weird. But since intentions are in play here, I have no back swing intentions or transition intentions if I'm really trying my best. My intention is narrowly set for what will happen post strike to the finish. But if I had to label the sequence I would call it punching up out of the ground with my legs post impact, and the punch up is providing the energy, if you will, for the club's rise to the finish. I think when Knudson talked about a flat lead foot that would be the most efficient way to punch up, instead of rolling over onto the outside of the foot. In order to punch up after the strike knee flex has to be maintained though not only transition but through a fairly big range of rotation following that, so that just prior to the strike my gut is ahead in rotation and pointing down range. It almost borders on a reverse C type platform, but not quite. So basically I hit the ball with my gut, that's my intention, and one can't hit with the gut if they early extend because the gut gets in the way, but the gut and leg extension can assist with moving the club up plane on the finish- a full body hit.

Player talked about an upper cut, and it's not very efficient throwing a underneath hay-maker from a lead foot that is rolling over on itself. Hogan said to reverse our natural instinct, which is our gut instinct, but I trust my gut instinct. I think it may simply be a binary choice, leave the gut behind for speed or use the gut for power. :)
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Re: Thoughts on Ben Hogan

Postby Range Rat » Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:02 pm

Like this way:

You're ahead of where you were, and behind where you're going.
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