Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby lecoeurdevie » Wed Apr 25, 2012 11:39 am

The copy of Getting Up & Down that I have, Watson says he went to 58 after playing with Kite when he went to 3 wedges in the mid 80s and all the Watson Scoring System Ram wedges were all 55 & 58 (and all with a ton of offset, really ugly). I don't have a clue what he really did but that was the only thing I ever read on the subject from him. I know Ollie never carried anything over 56, but he has that Seve blood in him and is that good he doesn't need an L wedge even now.
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby lefty76 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 9:24 am

Hello Lag,

I had a question for you. I am currently in the process of restoring a set of left-handed MacGregor 985's. I have had the ferrules duplicated and stamped with original serial numbers, purchased new grips, will have the clubheads re-shafted, re-chromed, and try and restore them to their original condition. They are beautiful clubs and I feel that classics like these deserve a makeover. The shafts are rusted, grips are worn, and the club-heads also have some rust.

It will be my player set and I wanted to ask you about loft and shaft length. The set is from the 2-PW. I was thinking of strengthening the lofts on them in this sequence:

2- 20 degrees loft
3- 24
4- 28
5- 32
6- 36
7- 40
8- 44
9- 48
PW- 52

I will be using a Macgregor sand iron. It has a loft of 56 degrees and is not part of the set. The woods I will be using are Joe Powell Persimmon Woods - Driver - 10.5, 3 wood - 15, and 4 wood - 18, which resemble the MacGregor M85 Wood. I have posted pictures on Golfwrx of the woods under the heading Joe Powell persimmon woods in the classic persimmon golf forum if you'd like to have a look. Pictures of the MacGregor 985's are in a thread headed MacGregor restoration.

As far as the shaft length, my current set is a set of Mizuno MP-68's 3-PW. They are a half inch over standard. The 3-iron is 39.25" and goes down in half inch increments. Then the 9 iron is 36.25 inches and the wedge is 36 inches only a quarter inch difference that's how the specs are from the factory. I was curious as to why only a quarter inch difference between the 9 and wedge?

I like the length of the mizunos and was thinking of having the MacGregor 2 iron start at 40.25 and see what the swingweight comes out to be after the heads are stripped, and new shafts are put in. This seems to be the tricky part. I am having them done by The Ironfactory since I do not have the equipment or know how for this project. What do you think of the lofts and length of the shafts I have in mind? Any feedback is much appreciated.

Randolph
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby lagpressure » Wed Oct 10, 2012 8:32 pm

I don't like a club too short.. so my 9 iron, PW and SW are pretty much the same length.. just a quarter inch difference here or there.

My PW is now set up at 50.. a gap at 53 and a SW at 56 but upright.

The SW has good bounce, but the gap is ground down like a PW.
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby swingpro » Tue Jan 01, 2013 8:48 am

Love this site! Currently my clubs are D3 SW and my 6 iron lie is 58 with DG X-100 and 37.5 inches. I am in the transition of going from a swinger to a hitter. When that happens how many degrees should I go flatter? I understand that you would like heavier and I agree that todays modern equipment manufacturers are going too long, too light and too upright. My question is this: Is it a personal preference to go to D5 thru D8 or 9 or would you like to see a specific SW on the irons? I can imagine playing D5, just think D8 may be too heavy. Thanks for all the info!
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby lagpressure » Tue Jan 01, 2013 11:28 am

Forget about swing weights. It means very little other than how the club appears to feel in your hands.. but I can take a super heavy club in dead weight and lighten the swing weight by butt weighting the club and turn it into a super light swing weight while the dead weight is getting even heavier.

Think deadweight... then work progressively through your set to keep a continuity there. So assuming you are using the same shafts, just changing the step pattern to suit you.. and length, and assume you are using the same grips ... then all you need to focus on is the gradation from lightest to heaviest heads.

For me I basically span from 15 ounce (1 iron) to 18 ounce (SW). I gradate the step pattens in my iron sets slightly different from set to set .. usually stiffer in the longer irons relative to what is considered normal. In other words.. while the step pattern is stiffest in a short iron to compensate for the heavier static head, I keep a tighter increment going up into the longer irons than most.

Even though a 1 iron is longer than a PW, it is a lighter club due to the lighter head weight.

Iron shafts are typically the same shaft, just down cut to length from the tip end to accommodate shorter clubs.

Wood shafts are different shafts. Longer and thinner and lighter. They are designed for adding length not for adding accuracy. If you are serious about hitting it straight, I suggest putting a 1 iron shaft in your driver. You'll have to extend it on the butt end to get it up to length, but you'll have a shaft that will be set up with the proper continuity to the rest of your set. I'm doing this now and the loss in distance has been negligible. I don't see going back. I haven't missed a fairway left in months. Hogan, Palmer, Floyd, Watkins all played the stiffer iron shafts in their drivers. I know this because my friend Ron Chalmers ran the company that made the shafts for them. It's a slightly modified iron shaft stuck in a driver or fairway wood. (Yes I will still use the word "wood" to keep with the tradition of the game 8-) )

But of course if you are out playing wide track dragstrip golf courses, then having a rocket driver is beneficial.
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby eagle » Sat Jan 26, 2013 5:57 am

Lag,

I hate to create work for you, but do you have any pictures of the Spalding driver you are using, and can you elaborate on what you have done, and are experimenting with in regards to making a super-stiff driver shaft?

Thanks,
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby lagpressure » Sat Jan 26, 2013 1:08 pm

The head is not much different than other drivers I have used... Penna's etc. This one we put in a Gamma Fire insert which legend has it propels the ball a few extra yards on a dead flush hit between the screws. I think it does, but don't have any proper scientific evidence to support the claim ;). Mike feels many of the Spalding blocks had the hardest persimmon.. and I agree from working on a few of them over the years.. just drilling into those heads to add weight etc.. the wood is very hard on most of them. The lie angle is 48 degrees.. which is in proper progression from my 1 iron, 4 wood, 2 wood..driver.

So this really then comes down to the shaft and my current thoughts on shafts. The question that lingered for a while is "why should irons and woods have different design to the shafts? Wood shafts historically, at least back into the 1940's or earlier started using a thinner, heavily tapered shaft into the persimmon heads. This concept of a different shaft in one's driver is still very much alive and thriving today. The simple answer is to gain more distance... both then and now.

However, what if the goal is not adding distance but instead is aimed at fine tuning accuracy? We certainly don't see the PGA Tour as being any kind of role model for accuracy with the driver... but they don't play proper golf courses very often in my opinion. I say proper in the same vein as Hogan described the tee shot as being the most important shot in the game. On a proper golf course, this would be the requirement. Any other kind of golf course design that does not require precision accuracy from the tee is a compromised golf course with watered down values. Distance off the tee should be "the right" distance. The shape of the ball moving off the tee should be "the right shape". The trajectory of the shot should be "the right trajectory" and all these combinations should be in the players driving arsenal if a golfer is truly a complete player.. and a masterful driver of the golf ball. This is my goal as a player. I want to be able to stand on the tee of any narrow golf hole and feel only confidence and inspiration to select the right combination of distance, shape, and trajectory then be able to execute that with professional competency. I disagree that the goal of selecting a driver is based upon velocity and launch angle with a club that is void of feedback and feel. That is for others to do, but not me.

So in designing a perfect driver for me.. my aim is to create a club that will offer good distance, but is really more geared for accuracy. The distance I get from my swing, rotational speed etc.. and the mass of the club 14.5 ounces, then length of the shaft 43.5 inches, and a maybe a little extra kick off the Gamma Fire.

The accuracy then comes from the flatter lie angle, the weight distribution inside the head, how it sits, how it fits my eye, and of course the shaft.

So the shaft is really not super stiff relative to my iron shafts.. it is basically exactly the same. This I can easily test on a deflection board. I don't believe in frequency matching shafts because there is no oscillation of the shaft prior to the ball leaving the clubface. I want the shaft to behave in the same way as my 1 iron shaft... or a wedge shaft relatively speaking. I don't want to have to use a "different swing" to hit my driver.
For that matter, I don't want to have to use a different swing to putt either.

So basically where I am going here ... is that I am no longer using driver shafts. The reason being is that they simply are not stiff enough relative to my iron shafts.... whether they are Propel #1 or tipped green band Rocket shafts. I like the older shafts.. not for nostalgic reasons.. but for physics reasons. Heavier shafts are more reliable in their flexation and offer better more reliable feedback from the strike which is vital to improving my golf swing. Since I strive to hold shaft flex, I am striking the ball with a loaded shaft when I am playing well.. not a released shaft void of stored energy. I hit the ball with the whole club. I think of it more like a baseball bat.. not a weight on a string.

So the problem with iron shafts put into woods is that they don't come long enough. The 1 iron cut is usually the starting point... max length.. and then all the shorter clubs are simply tipped down off the stock full length shaft... they are cut from the bottom.. not the grip end.

So to get an iron shaft into a driver.. we had to find a way to lengthen them using an extender or a combination of extenders. I have never seen an iron shaft at 44 inches. Of course they could have been made that way, but all the club companies switch to wood shafts once the clubs get into 40 plus inches.

So the final big consideration is adding an extra 4 inches to the length of a shaft.. this makes the shaft more flexible.. so from a deflection standpoint, it actually needs to be significantly stiffer to keep deflection from getting out of relative sequence.
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby eagle » Mon Jan 28, 2013 6:03 am

Thanks!
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby Bulldozer » Sat Dec 27, 2014 8:53 pm

Are the Spalding woods oil hardened also?
It seems like wood soaked in oil would make the wood softer?

Lag, have you changed your specs since the last time you posted them?
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Re: Lag's Personal Equipment Specifications

Postby norcalvol » Sat Dec 27, 2014 10:31 pm

I have a set of Model No. 28's. They weren’t oil-hardened, but Spalding used a wood treating process called “Hydrosealed.” And they were known for their especially hard persimmon wood.

When you hit one in the screws, they have a feeling unlike any persimmon club I've ever hit. So solid.
Accelerate forever!
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