USGA on Twitter

USGA on Twitter

Postby SteelArcher » Thu Feb 14, 2013 7:45 am

Hey everyone,

I'm new to the community, but I love browsing the forums. The information here is second to none!

Anyway, I recently noticed that the USGA has a Twitter account. While I'm sure they don't pay much attention to it, I wondered if they might have to if a whole bunch of us started tweeting them to limit the golf ball and put tighter standards on equipment.

I think if enough people get on their case, they're bound to notice.

What do you think?
SteelArcher
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:34 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby Craig Toone » Thu Feb 14, 2013 4:17 pm

Most likely its some PR company tweeting for them who are only interested in building the 'brand'

I'm game anyway... @craigtoone
Craig Toone
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:36 am

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby SteelArcher » Thu Feb 14, 2013 9:28 pm

You're probably right, Craig, but still. I have to believe that if enough of us gave 'em a good enough hassle, it'd draw some attention. Maybe tweet the guys on 'Morning Drive' too... just get people talking about it again.

Thanks for getting in on the action haha :D.

Who else is up to the task??

Lag? Help us out here? ;)
SteelArcher
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:34 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby lagpressure » Thu Feb 14, 2013 11:24 pm

It's a great idea...
I won't shut up until the great game returns to some kind of sanity.

I'm doing an interview for a British Golf Magazine in a couple weeks.... and I will continue to drive home the key points about professionals being the role models for the game..

That the pros need to be tested with all their clubs not just drivers and mid to short irons.

To preserve the historical relevance of the game, the clubs used must be similar in design... and that the radical departure into frying pan sized drivers belittles the efforts of past great players and trivializes the sport.

That spin on the ball is a good thing for shaping shots. Balata balls were better with the higher spin rates for good players to help them access tucked pins, and that quality players should be thinking both trajectory and shot shape... and what direction the ball is going to spin when it hits the green.

That golf courses need to be harmonious with the gear being used.

That rough is supposed to be a penalty and that a premium must return to driving accuracy. The idea that pros can win a tour event hitting less that 50% of their fairways should not be commonplace if ever happening.

That courses do not need to be 7400 yards to be championship.

That the shape and design of a green should be consistent with the trajectory of the approaches shots, and that average pros and good amateur players should be coming into a few par 4's with lower trajectory iron shots to have that skill set tested properly.

That the golf swing in general has deteriorated over the decades due to a lack of necessity for proper ball striking.

That courses do not have to be in perfect condition to host championships, compete and enjoy, and that there is a skill set in playing off a variety of lies and putting on greens of various speeds.

Sidehill lies from the fairway are interesting and require a skill set not only played from the fairway but also should be considered from the tee shot.

Homogeneous treatment of golf course conditioning is not making the game more interesting. That American golf course restoration businesses are not understanding that by viewing aerial photos of golf courses designed 75+ years ago were not all intended to be treeless park courses. THEY PLANTED TREES! that don't always show up on those photos.
User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8175
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby Craig Toone » Fri Feb 15, 2013 2:53 am

Looking forwards to picking up a copy Lag. Funnily enough I haven't bought a golf mag in years. But I was stuck in the supermarket yesterday with 10 minutes to kill so read the mag at the stall.... Can't remember which title, but there is a good interview with the big easy Els who talks about how much the game has changed in the past 18 years & that average guys now have more chance thanks to technology. There are no longer any stand out ballstrikers in the form of a Norman or early Tiger
Craig Toone
 
Posts: 160
Joined: Fri Aug 24, 2012 3:36 am

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby lagpressure » Fri Feb 15, 2013 11:59 am

I enjoy playing golf as much as ever. I pick and choose quality persimmon tracks that interest me to play, and of course I use gear that is in harmony with the architecture and enjoy keeping historical perspective. It feels good to know the score I shoot actually can be compared to any rounds played there from any era. While today's gear has been deemed legal by the authorities of the game, it would not be legal in the bigger picture and any scores shot today by amateurs or pros using modern gear are only relevant in context to the most recent era since about 1998. In my opinion, there should be two sets of records kept since the introduction of steel shafts. Balata age, then post Balata titanium frying pan era.

I have no problem with people choosing the version of golf they wish to play... or competitions set up for various gear and courses. But to disregard the persimmon and blade era and make comparisons of this era to the accomplishments of those of the past is disrespectful and incorrect. The US Open record of 8 under established by Hogan and Nicklaus played with persimmon and balata still stands... meaning played with persimmon and balata under proper US Open conditions. Rory's record is fine but should be noted for being in the frying pan plastic golf ball era. It's pretty simple really. Could probably just draw the divider at 1998. Personally I would spit it at about 1992.

The original Big Bertha driver was launched in 1991. At the time, its design was considered highly modern and a radical departure from older drivers: it was crafted entirely of stainless steel and the head had a volume of 190 cm³. Most other drivers were still made of persimmon wood and had smaller heads. (By way of comparison, many drivers of recent years have head sizes up to the USGA legal maximum of 460 cm³ and are made of more exotic materials such as titanium.)

Since the introduction of the original Big Bertha, Callaway has introduced further clubs and lines of clubs with similar names, such as the "Great Big Bertha", the "Biggest Big Bertha", and titanium versions of the clubs. In 2003, they introduced the "Great Big Bertha II," and in 2004, the "Big Bertha 454." They have also introduced two lines of irons using the name.


User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8175
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby SteelArcher » Sat Feb 16, 2013 11:29 pm

I can't agree with you more about the records, Lag. It's really shameful when you hear so-called "pundits" go on and on about how incredible something/someone is (take your example of Rory at Congressional) when they have lost any kind of perspective. It pains me to see these players miss shot after shot after shot from < 150 yards and yet be called professionals. Truly, did Hogan, Snead or Trevino miss their 9 irons 40 yards left/right regularly? No, but you can't say that about Lee Westwood or Greame McDowell...

And don't get me started on the irons haha. I'm in a state of perpetual shock that these players game giant, GI, cavity back irons. It's just ridiculous. I don't mind average Joe having a set, but the top players in the world? Come on.
SteelArcher
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:34 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby lagpressure » Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:42 am

Members of the Champions Tour Player Advisory Council meeting last week before the Allianz Championship to discuss the possible ban, which could be announced at the end of this month.

"They said that's why I'm there," said Michael Allen, the only member of the 13-player Champions Tour PAC that uses a long putter, although statistics show that nearly one in five players on the circuit use anchored putters.

According to officials at the meeting, which lasted about an hour, 18 percent of Champions Tour players use a belly or long putter.

It's interesting to note that two of those are Bernhard Langer and Fred Couples, among the tour's biggest starts, and in fact two of the three players featured on the cover of the 2013 Champions Tour media guide.

"I would certainly try (to putt) another way," Langer said of what he might do if the USGA and Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews ban anchored putters, as they have indicated they will do.

"It depends on what happens and we're still in the question phase, but if I don't enjoy the game anymore then I would stop playing."

The day after Davis' meeting with PGA Tour players at Torrey Pines, Commissioner Tim Finchem left open the possibility that his tour might be open to a bifurcation of the Rules of Golf, but said it was unlikely in this case.

Some members of the Champions Tour seem open to the idea.

"I would hate to break away from what the PGA Tour does, but yeah. I probably would (be in favor of bifurcation on the senior circuit)," said Peter Jacobsen, a member of the Champions Tour PAC.

"To keep people like Langer, a Hall of Fame superstar and one of the best people I've ever met, to keep him playing. Michael Allen, Fred Couples, go down the list. I want these guys playing. We probably could (bifurcate)."

The Champions Tour already exercises a level of bifurcation with the PGA Tour, especially by allowing players to use golf carts during rounds.

Others are against the Champions Tour going its own way.

"I don't think we would (bifurcate)," Brad Faxon said. "That would be a mistake for us to do something different. It's a hot topic, especially out here. But the hardest thing to do is to get a rational, non-biased opinion on what is best for the game and what is best for the tour. ...

"Who really has the best interest of the game? That's where we have to leave governing away from us."

Champions Tour officials planned to survey its members in order to get a consensus opinion on the situation.

--By announcing the addition of the U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship and U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball Championship, which will begin in 2015, the United States Golf Association might have been trying to soften the pushback from eliminating the men's and women's U.S. Amateur Public Links Championships after 2014.

The USGA made both announcements simultaneously.

"It wasn't without a lot of thought," said Tom O'Toole, chairman of the USGA's championship committee, on the Golf Channel. "We're not in the business of canceling championships, so this is a somber note.

"But the mission of those Public Links Championships, the men's (inaugurated) in 1922 and the women's in 1977, no longer served that original purpose or mission. So it was the decision of the committee that we'd go in a different direction at this time and retire those championships, and really for the next two years celebrate them with great flair and flavor because they've been a great fiber of what the USGA has been about ... ."

The men's Publinx was the USGA's fourth-oldest championship, dating to 1922.

Among the winners of those tournaments are Tim Clark (1997), Trevor Immelman (1998), Michelle Wie (2003), Brandt Snedeker (2003) and Ryan Moore (2002 and 2004).

Reaction from pros who played in those events was swift, in this day of social media, as several of them took to Twitter. Here is a sampling of what they said:

Arron Oberholser: "Ok, so lemme get this straight, you're adding 4-ball (cool) but getting rid of the championship for which your organization stands." And later, sarcastically, "USGA to "retire" US AM comp in favor of husband/wife "nine & dine". Winner receives 2 for 1 Waffle House passes Masters week. LOL."

Brendan Steele, who already is not happy with the USGA because he uses a belly putter: "USGA makes another bad decision by getting rid of the US Pub Links. Keep it going guys. See what else you can ruin."

Keegan Bradley, another guy with the belly putter: "Really sorry to hear that the public links will be cancelled in 2014. It's a great tournament for game. Very surprised. Replaced by 4ball?"

The Four-Ball Championships will be two-person team competitions played annually between mid-March and late May. Each male competitor must have a USGA handicap index of 5.4 or lower, while women need indexes of 14.4 of lower.

There is no age requirement for eligibility, and the partners need not be from the same club, state or country.

The fields for the men's and women's events will consist of 128 and 64 teams, respectively, with 32 teams advancing to match play after 36 holes of stroke play.

"To bring that popular event to a national championship context seemed like a perfect fit," O'Toole said.

As for the Publinx, this is the first time the USGA has eliminated an event. The Masters thought so much of the Men's Pulbinx that the winner received an invitation to the first major of the year.
User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8175
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby lagpressure » Mon Feb 18, 2013 2:45 am

eliminating the men's and women's U.S. Amateur Public Links Championships after 2014.


USGA, how much worse can this organization get?
User avatar
lagpressure
Site Admin
 
Posts: 8175
Joined: Thu Jun 04, 2009 12:50 pm

Re: USGA on Twitter

Postby SteelArcher » Tue Feb 19, 2013 12:06 pm

lagpressure wrote:USGA, how much worse can this organization get?


Ha, just wait. A lot worse would be no surprise
SteelArcher
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:34 pm

Next

Return to Equipment

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests