Q&A with Greg Norman

Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby Whitworth » Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:45 am

Greg Norman on equipment:

http://golfweek.com/2017/02/16/q-a-with ... -12-years/


Dusek: As a group, elite players hit about 55 percent of the fairways.
Norman: Which is ridiculous.

Norman: I had a former No. 1 player in the world come over to my house for dinner three nights ago, and he wanted to pick my brain because he can’t drive the golf ball. Hell of an iron player,
but he can’t drive the ball.
I told him, “Ok, sit back and think about which is your favorite iron. Might be a 5-iron or a 6-iron. Now strip that golf club down, understand what that golf club is giving you and replicate it in your driver.”
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby Turfrider » Wed Mar 29, 2017 9:38 am

Thanks for the link. I found it interesting that after saying he used x400 shafts in his driver, he wanted the shaft in the head just far enough that it would stay in. I assumed that for durability and stiffness one wanted the shaft to go right to the bottom of the club. I mention this because I have an M43 driver, the model he used. When I received it it had the bottom screw, meaning the shaft did not go all the way to the bottom. Well, after practicing on the range that screw started to come loose and eventually the head came off. Old epoxy I figured because it still has the original shaft. I re epoxied and for simplicity sake put it in till it was flush with the sole of the club. I figured this is what ole Greg would've done :D Definitely changed the feel. I think I may want to have it changed back to how it was.
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby lagpressure » Fri Mar 31, 2017 9:53 pm

I miss this level of understanding and involvement in the underlaying form of the game. A great player, thinker speaks on some important topics. Greg was one of the great persimmon drivers of the golf ball. Set up your driver like your long irons. It's what I do as well. Don't need two swings to play this game well.

Norman: Well, even in my competitive days I never really followed the trends, because I made my own golf clubs and did my own thing.

Today, from a player’s standpoint, I think they rely on too much technology, especially with the driver and the shaft.

I think if you look at the game of golf today, if you look at the disparity among the top players when you look at their iron game and the way that they drive a golf ball, it’s night and day.

If I used driver on 10 holes during a round and missed two to the left, then I knew there was something going on.

The shaft in my driver was very similar to the shaft in my irons, so I couldn’t blame it on the torque in the shaft. The driver head was smaller, not like today’s 460cc heads.

When the original Big Bertha driver
was released everyone thought they couldn’t miss because it seemed massive. Today that club would be a 5-wood.
Norman: Exactly.

The USGA and R&A released a report last year saying that distance is not a problem in professional golf. What are your thoughts on that?
Norman: I had a former No. 1 player in the world come over to my house for dinner three nights ago, and he wanted to pick my brain because he can’t drive the golf ball. Hell of an iron player, but he can’t drive the ball.

I told him, “Ok, sit back and think about which is your favorite iron. Might be a 5-iron or a 6-iron. Now strip that golf club down, understand what that golf club is giving you and replicate it in your driver.”
 
Dusek: Did he look at you as if you had three heads?
Norman: Zip … right over his head.


Dusek: A driver swing and an iron swing are seen by a lot of players as two completely different skill sets.
Norman: I don’t want to speak against my company here, but a lot of players are given a club and told, “Ok, go use it.” And how many graphite shafts are out there, hundreds? If there is doubt in their mind, they go right out and try a new shaft.

I used one driver for 12 years.

You never cracked the face?
Norman: Oh, of course, but I would epoxy it back up. I balanced it out, took the epoxy out and rebuilt it. The shaft was a True Temper Dynamic Gold X400, and the spine angle was a 4:30 (on a clock face, looking down the shaft). I could tell you exactly where the spine angle was.

I’ll give you another example. I won’t mention the player’s name, but a couple of years ago I was talking to a top player about flanges on sand wedges. I went to his bag and said, “Man, the flange on your sand wedge has a lot of bounce on it.” He said he didn’t know what I meant. I said, “How can you play that in Australia or any place that has tight lies?” He said he still didn’t know what I was talking about. So I went to my bag, grabbed a Sharpie, put my finger on the leading edge and showed him the difference between the bottom of the flange and the height of the leading edge. “Look at the difference!” He said he never even realized it.

my sand wedge only had 54 degrees of loft.

Where did your power come from?
Norman: Confidence. If I had a piece of equipment in my hand and I knew how it was going to react, every time I make it react the way I want, I’ve eliminated a doubt. That let me swing away. If I wanted to add 15 yards to my drive, in a heartbeat, I could do it. I knew exactly what was going to happen and how it was going to happen.
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby fontaine32 » Thu Apr 13, 2017 4:47 am

Norman: I had a former No. 1 player in the world come over to my house for dinner three nights ago, and he wanted to pick my brain because he can’t drive the golf ball. Hell of an iron player, but he can’t drive the ball. I told him, “Ok, sit back and think about which is your favorite iron. Might be a 5-iron or a 6-iron. Now strip that golf club down, understand what that golf club is giving you and replicate it in your driver.”..........

My guess is Luke Donald. (Short and crooked)
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby Stu Carlburger » Sat Apr 15, 2017 9:25 am

Great read ... thanks for posting!

Personally, I think the saddest aspect of golf these days is the pigeon hole/straight jacket effect, of which Lag and Brad oft and aptly speak, the the equipment manufacturers have on serious player -- and it seems even Tour elites are not immune to this effect.

I was reading back through some old discussions here and elsewhere on driver lie angles and it's amazing how polarized the discussion is around the various forums. For literally centuries lie angles flattened as clubs lengthened. Then, out of the blue, some OEM club designer geek just decided that making drivers with 9 iron lies was not only appropriate, but was ALL they were going to make now and eveyone was going to have to adapt to them.

All anyone wants to talk about is how there is minimal effect on ball flight with a driver that's way too upright because of the relatively low loft. So as Fointaine aptly said, why do it then? They know what it's for, and it isn't a quality move. But further, the point they always neglect is the fact that our miraculous inner athlete will almost always try to return the club to its balanced position. Meaning, a toe up (upright) club encourages an upward arching of the wrists ... and all us ABS'ers know the cascade effect of forces destructive to cohesion and clubface stabilty.

Yet WE are the crazy ones! It's pathetic. It's like people walking around with a dramatically uneven heal in their shoe and wondering why they have back issues! When we bring up the driver lie issue, they just parrot back, "Bwack! No effect! Bwack! Shaft droop!"

Maybe someone -- like Bradley -- can get to Norman as he's someone with the resources (and seemingly the conviction) to start making equipment properly again! I have dreams about playing a round with a driver that is the "proper" progressive lie angle. Every time I miss a drive -- whether left or right -- I can't help but wondering if it's that "handle raise vs. fight handle raise" issue. Further, I know that the body will react to the club it last used. As Lag talks about with club weight, the same has to be true with lies as well. it's just overall confusing to that gifted inner athlete we all have inside us. It makes the "right swing" but it's the wrong lie, then it tries to make the swing to fit that lie, but now it's the right lie, and so on through out the day.

The game is difficult enough!
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby lagpressure » Sun Apr 16, 2017 8:48 am

It's just easier to market "distance" to the masses.... so whatever they can come up with to cater to that.
As far as the upright lie angle of modern drivers... as long as there is some loft, the upright lie angle give the club more of a hook disposition
because as the toe raises, any loft will then be skewed left, even if slightly. Since most golfers slice the ball, it just plays into poor golf swings
that strive to hit the ball slightly farther without really changing their golf swing mechanics. Most people don't have the time or dedication to
work on their swings, and even if they do, there are a lot of dead ends and bad information floating around, especially today in the age of internet
surfing etc.

When I was growing up... any club pro I ever heard of was at least a scratch player or better. Most pros in "pro shops" were either former touring or min tour pros who had a proper sensibility of the game. With the explosion of golf that happened a while back, they simply had to lower the bar of qualification to a point that a 10 handicap golfer could enter the profession as an "expert or pro" on the business side of things.... and even teaching - instruction.
It's understandable from a practical view of the situation, but it's not good.
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Re: Q&A with Greg Norman

Postby k2baloo » Mon Apr 17, 2017 6:45 am

The upright lies drive me crazy. I was in a golf store the other day and I couldn't hit any of the clubs decently because they're all too upright. I don't play ABS specs, most my stuff is 2 or 3 degrees flat, but I still had no chance with any of it.
I have to stand too tall with the upright stuff which means I can't load into the ground. I also can't rotate through the shot like I want.
I was mostly there to look at used putters, but wanted to get a couple full swings in while I was there.
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