stubborn shaft removal

For the brave ones!

stubborn shaft removal

Postby IanB » Fri Dec 26, 2014 4:39 pm

Hey guys,

I recently bought a set of slazenger/hogan powerthrusts and the shafts are proving to be VERY stubborn!

Q1 Any good tips on how to even FIND the pins they all but invisible but they ARE there I managed to hammer out three so far. Heat did show them up on the first few but there are some that isn't working on.

Q2 On the clubs I couldn't get the pins out I cut the shaft and drilled them out. Still couldn't get the shafts out and bought a mitchell shaft extractor which is now blunt after only three shafts and won't set? What the heck are these things made of they seem almost indestructible!!!! :shock: :shock: Any thoughts or suggestions? Much as it pains me Im ready to admit defeat. My white cameos were a total walk in the park compared to these!!

Q3 Anyone have experience with the mitchell shaft extractor? …….Why would it be blunt after only three shafts?

Kindest, IanB
There is DO and there is DO NOT. There is no TRY.
IanB
 
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:57 am

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby k2baloo » Fri Dec 26, 2014 7:13 pm

Wow almost invisible?
I reshafted my hogan pc5 irons and the pins were very visible and I pounded them out with a pin punch.
Not sure what to do in your situation though. Good luck!
k2baloo
 
Posts: 979
Joined: Wed May 15, 2013 5:43 pm

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby mdrretired » Fri Dec 26, 2014 9:40 pm

I have done probably 100 plus sets of pinned irons over the years and while some are very stubborn, most will come out with a few basics. I have found that a short pin punch works best to start the pin out. I converted an old broken one into a short version maybe 1/4" long. The shorter punch seems to provide more direct force to the pin. Use the longer punch to finish the job. Make one if you have to and sacrifice a long one to get a short one if neccessary.

The absolute most important part is to have the shaft against a hard surface. A rubber shaft clamp will not usually work very well. Try setting the hosel between two pieces of aluminum or brass in your vise. Crank down pretty well on the vise to really secure the hosel and try the new punch. A few short taps will reveal if the pin will drift out a tad. You might try reversing the hosel and going at it from the other side. Once I find out whether the pins comes out with the club face up or down then I stay with that orientation for the rest of the set. I suspect that it has something to do with the direction the pins were installed. You might also get a friend to hold the shaft over the vise end so you can hold the punch and hammer.

Many, but not all, old irons will come apart with no heat at all if you use a wood leverage bar. The heads just twist off. You really need the longer aluminum shaft clamp to provide the grip necessary on the shaft though. Most Hogans were forced on to the shaft and then pinned - no glue and they usually come right off. Sometimes a little heat can be used to expand the hosel without also getting the shaft expanded and that helps remove the head. A few old Spalding and Wilson sets had threaded shaft tips - pretty neat technology. These can be a bugger unless you remember that they tightened up in the direction of the strike/hit on the face (sort of like a knock-off wheel on a race car) so they come off reverse of that.

For a cut or broken shaft:
I love Mitchell equipment (my loft and lie machine is a Mitchell - Lag dislikes it, Van L only for him) but you really only need common easy outs (EO) available at any ACE Hardware. Get a good quality Irwin or Vermont American EO tool or a set and then make sure that the shaft end is cut flush and not jagged (broken shaft for example) in order to get an equal bite on the exposed shaft. Easy outs can get dull after a number of uses but they are fairly cheap at ACE. Remember after you cut the shaft to drill out the pin from the inside and to also to tap out the pin ends before you try the EO tool. Try making a set of wood vise jaws to hold the iron head while you apply heat and use the EO tool. I use "T" handles on all my EO tools but a wrench will work too. Message me or call for any additional help. I probably forgot something so let me know. Mike
mdrretired
 
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 7:23 pm

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby IanB » Sat Dec 27, 2014 3:55 am

Heated and then the blue removed still no pin !
I know its there though unless some of the set isn't pinned which I would be doubtful of. As the top pic shows they are in there LOL
Attachments
IMG_9657.jpg
IMG_9657.jpg (44.95 KiB) Viewed 4339 times
IMG_9654.JPG
IMG_9654.JPG (68.34 KiB) Viewed 4341 times
There is DO and there is DO NOT. There is no TRY.
IanB
 
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:57 am

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby IanB » Sat Dec 27, 2014 4:10 am

Mike thank you very much for that terrific reply tons of great info in there I am working my way through it. Bitter experience has shown me the best place for me to hammer out pins is on my basement floor which is concrete with a thin layer of carpet to keep the noise down. I do know what you mean about having a solid place to hammer against!! Im going to Ace to get a set of easy outs the Mitchell broken shaft extractor was pretty pricey and I think is to dull to use now. Once you get the easy out in there how do you pull it out? Am I thinking of the right thing they look like a weird spiral drill bit ??
There is DO and there is DO NOT. There is no TRY.
IanB
 
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:57 am

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby mdrretired » Sat Dec 27, 2014 6:38 pm

The easy out is designed to turn counterclockwise (CCW) for screw removal. We are adapting it to another use - removing shafts. Perhaps you have a shaft that was not pinned - unusual but possible. Was this shaft cut? If so and if you have drilled into the hosel then you either found the pin and cut it or it was not there. Try securing the head in the vise with pads, insert the easy out and tap it lightly to seat it, then turn to the left CCW and see if the shaft turns at all. If not, apply a bit of heat and try again. The reason I like the "T" handle is that I can pull as I turn the EO. See this Ebay item # link for the best EO design : 121514619649. This Ebay item link is for the "T"" handle: 221628011961

If the shaft has not been cut and there is no pin, then try a bit of heat and a leverage bar - To make one, use a hardwood 2x4" maybe 18-20" long and cut maybe a 1 1/4" slot about half way thru at the center, enough room to fit the head in in order to turn the head when secured in the vise. Remember to turn the head into the "hit" direction of the swing. Think about hitting the ball as an act that actually tightens the shaft to the head and go the other way just in case these are threaded shafts.

I think the carpet will flex and soften the blow too much for some of the stubborn pins to come out. I find it is really important to have a super secure foundation for the club before you begin punching pins. Makes it a lot easier too. Keep plugging, you will figure it out. Let me know how you are coming or call. Mike
mdrretired
 
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 7:23 pm

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby IanB » Mon Mar 21, 2016 6:22 pm

Mike how are your doing sir?

Made a lot of progress with pin removal however Im really in need if your wooden leverage bar and and not quite understanding?
Any chance of a pic of it or a drawing?
My pole driver turned out nice with a cleveland head !!

Kindest, IanB
There is DO and there is DO NOT. There is no TRY.
IanB
 
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Dec 23, 2013 11:57 am

Re: stubborn shaft removal

Postby mdrretired » Tue Mar 22, 2016 8:08 pm

My leverage bar is a scrap of oak 2x4 about 12" long that I cut a 1 3/4" wide notch maybe 1/2 way through the width about 3" in from the end. You need hard wood, not pine. Also think about getting a large adjustable wrench and wrapping some electrical tape around the jaws. That allows you to adjust the jaws to fit the iron head. Golf Works etc. used to carry a hardwood bar that was shaped like large tuning fork. If not clear then I will take a picture.

While we are at it, I learned something interesting. Many old pinned irons may come off without heat if you use the leverage bar. They were often forced on then pinned with no glue. I found this true sometimes with really old Hogans, and some Staffs. If not, then try a just little heat before you nuke it.

Mike
mdrretired
 
Posts: 112
Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 7:23 pm


Return to Golf Club Repair (Vintage Gear)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron