The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Range Rat » Fri Oct 03, 2014 3:44 am

Shucks alive Teebox, we have an audience! :lol:

This is an excellent post but I get a bit uncomfortable when you start talking in the third person. :) I used to work in Big Pharma and I'm sure there is a double-blind study somewhere starting up with your name on it. I think RR could benefit as well though I've always had the suspicion that RR discovered the last lost batch of Tim Leary's blotter acid. I think it's hidden deep in the Rat's freezer that only an arctic expedition could uncover. :lol:

I only post this in my undying support and admiration for both of you and remember: 'when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.


If you substitute the word 'produced' instead of 'discovered' you will be accurate and it was quite good I should add as you will notice: while others fart around with silly concepts like Right OR Left, or Right TO Left, I move Right OF Left.
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby 1teebox » Wed Oct 29, 2014 7:25 am

Trust
Trust is something in our swing that some of us wrestle with.
Some people, sometimes, don't appear to have a problem with trust...

I’d been in country several months and was getting itchy to do more besides the usual work-sleep-read routine.
I was not looking to be a do-gooder.
Somebody somehow convinced me to ride along with other jarheads in the back of a Four-By (light truck) to a Vietnamese orphanage somewhere in DaNang outside the airbase perimeter.
After seeing dog-patch kids sleeping on bare ground next to putrid gutter-slurry during my occasional aimless off-duty trips to the Freedom Hill PX, I was curious if orphanage conditions were any better.

In less than fifteen minutes I had no idea where we were and was entirely dependent on the driver to eventually get us back inside the airbase.
The truck stopped and its thick cloud of wheel-dust caught inside our noses.
From the outside, as best I could tell, the orphanage did not promise to be a beacon of hope.
All was quiet until we were noticed and then the kids inside the front gates went nuts, running, jumping, and scrambling all around us even though we had nothing to give them, at least I did not.

Our tour included a room of infants in playpens.
These kids had various injuries and ailments.
I was edgy wondering how their maladies happened and fearful of letting any of these kids too deep into my uneasy conscience.
I went outside where the ambulatory were playing in the oppressive sunburned greasy air.
There was this tiny, barefoot, skinny-legged kid in sun-bleached rags running hell-bent along the top center length of a long table, then he squealed and jumped gleefully off the far end out into empty space and into the distant waiting arms of a Marine I did not know.
The kid received a quick hug, immediately leaped free, turned toward the bench table, and scampered atop to repeat his run-and-leap routine.

Then I noticed a jaw-dropping fact. The kid was completely blind.

He repeated his running leap many times.
When it came time for us to leave the orphanage, the kid did not want to stop jumping.

How had this blind orphan's trust come to life and to be so strong?
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Paul C » Wed Oct 29, 2014 8:27 am

1teebox wrote:Trust
Trust is something in our swing that some of us wrestle with.
Some people, sometimes, don't appear to have a problem with trust...

I’d been in country several months and was getting itchy to do more besides the usual work-sleep-read routine.
I was not looking to be a do-gooder.
Somebody somehow convinced me to ride along with other jarheads in the back of a Four-By (light truck) to a Vietnamese orphanage somewhere in DaNang outside the airbase perimeter.
After seeing dog-patch kids sleeping on bare ground next to putrid gutter-slurry during my occasional aimless off-duty trips to the Freedom Hill PX, I was curious if orphanage conditions were any better.

In less than fifteen minutes I had no idea where we were and was entirely dependent on the driver to eventually get us back inside the airbase.
The truck stopped and its thick cloud of wheel-dust caught inside our noses.
From the outside, as best I could tell, the orphanage did not promise to be a beacon of hope.
All was quiet until we were noticed and then the kids inside the front gates went nuts, running, jumping, and scrambling all around us even though we had nothing to give them, at least I did not.

Our tour included a room of infants in playpens.
These kids had various injuries and ailments.
I was edgy wondering how their maladies happened and fearful of letting any of these kids too deep into my uneasy conscience.
I went outside where the ambulatory were playing in the oppressive sunburned greasy air.
There was this tiny, barefoot, skinny-legged kid in sun-bleached rags running hell-bent along the top center length of a long table, then he squealed and jumped gleefully off the far end out into empty space and into the distant waiting arms of a Marine I did not know.
The kid received a quick hug, immediately leaped free, turned toward the bench table, and scampered atop to repeat his run-and-leap routine.

Then I noticed a jaw-dropping fact. The kid was completely blind.

He repeated his running leap many times.
When it came time for us to leave the orphanage, the kid did not want to stop jumping.

How had this blind orphan's trust come to life and to be so strong?


I think, trust, for most of us can be like a luxury item, like a good goose liver pate spread on a toasted baugette topped with finely chopped red onion. For that kid, trust, has to be part of his operating system. It's all he's got.
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Range Rat » Sun Nov 23, 2014 5:04 am

Tis' the season of white cold architecture falling down upon our heads from the clouds, or from poor design from the ground up. I found this to be fascinating for several reasons.


igloo.jpg
igloo.jpg (26.3 KiB) Viewed 6653 times


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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Mashie72 » Sun Nov 23, 2014 2:43 pm

That's pretty neat RR

You'd think the dogs could only help keep you warm inside or obviously be good for the dogs since it's 40 below outside
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Range Rat » Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:27 pm

Was just window shopping on YT during some free time, which as all retirees know is plentiful, when I stumbled across this fellow- not sure if I've seen him before. I just like his channel overall. I like his use of imagery, simple talk, down home British accent, aristocracy feel, and good overall content to boot. It appears he has been on YT for over a year and the number of views is quite small for sound product.

Then again, anyone falling into spiral mode can't be all bad for a look, and he also has a video called the Rat Maze, so he can't be all bad. :lol: Pip-Pip-Cherio!!
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Paul C » Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:57 pm

Range Rat wrote:Was just window shopping on YT during some free time, which as all retirees know is plentiful, when I stumbled across this fellow- not sure if I've seen him before. I just like his channel overall. I like his use of imagery, simple talk, down home British accent, aristocracy feel, and good overall content to boot. It appears he has been on YT for over a year and the number of views is quite small for sound product.

Then again, anyone falling into spiral mode can't be all bad for a look, and he also has a video called the Rat Maze, so he can't be all bad. :lol: Pip-Pip-Cherio!!


Automatic, automatic? (He grew to such a tremendous size, his head hit the ceiling. Unhappy, he cried a roomful of tears and was swept away down the rabbit hole, joining the others at a tea party) Apologies to Lewis Carroll...

And, I hate his hat. I couldn't get past the hat.
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Range Rat » Mon Dec 22, 2014 6:57 am

Yes, the hat is kind of David Leadbetterish and would be better off placed into a circular file instead of upstairs where hair roots no longer live.

I just like the formality of his communication style. For instance, some instructors on a lesson tee might say "WTF are you doing"- in a kind way of course 8-) - but Franklyn might say "that is inappropriate, let's look at something less tainted." :lol:

Here is another spiral one- a little stallish, but it is what it is for the thread's purpose.
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby eagle » Mon Dec 22, 2014 12:12 pm

Saw this on prime numbers, not sure how it may relate to The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, etc...but who knows..

http://www.wired.com/2014/12/mathematic ... e-numbers/

Merry Christmas everyone!
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Re: The Nautilus, the Golf Swing, Golden Ratio, Fibonacci seque

Postby Range Rat » Tue Dec 23, 2014 6:39 am

Not sure about that either Eagle but funny you should mention that. Just the other day I was helping a young rat using prime factorization in finding the greatest common multiple and since I was a little rusty with my math mechanics I found a site with numerous math topics on it, and under prime numbers this little piece of information was used:

Prime numbers aren't too hard to define, but they still puzzle professional mathematicians. Believe it or not, all over the word computers are chugging away, trying to find the next biggest prime! Bigger and bigger prime numbers help keep your credit card info safe through really cool encryption techniques. So prime numbers really matter every day, and you can learn how they are defined in this tutorial.

Maybe Santa has the answers, I'll have to ask when I see him. :lol:
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